Tuning water-in-Silicone Systems to maximize the release rate and skin penetration of actives

Tuning water-in-Silicone Systems to maximize the release rate and skin penetration of actives

25 Oct 2017, 14:00 - 14:20

Grange Tower Bridge Hotel

Language:
English

The stratum corneum (SC), the skin’s outermost layer, is the principal component of the cutaneous barrier acting as a physical barrier controlling the percutaneous absorption of external substances. The SC is composed of stacked corneocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix mainly constituted from ceramides, cholesterol and fatty acids. This matrix represents the sole continuous region of the SC and the preferential pathway to deliver cosmetic actives into the skin.

Although the diffusion of a molecule through the SC depends on its concentration, physicochemical properties, degree of solubility, interaction with skin components, potential metabolic and photochemical transformation within the skin, the composition of the topical formulation influences greatly both the bioavailability and release rate of the active from the formulation.

Dow demonstrated that a formulation can be tuned around different classes of silicone-based excipients to maximize the release rate and skin penetration profiles of anti-ageing actives formulated into water-in-silicone systems.

 

Contributors

  • Marc Eeman

    Speaker

    Skin Care Application Designer

    DOW

    Marc Eeman holds a PhD degree in Agricultural Sciences and Biological Engineering from Gembloux Agricultural University in Belgium. In 2008, he...

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